Categories
Popular posts

How to add your own pronunciations on iPhone and iPad

When it comes to using the accessibility features on iPhone and iPad, there are times when you need to make some tweaks. For spoken content it could be the speaking rate or the voice you hear. With this, have there ever been times when things didn’t sound quite right?

A great example is if you have one of those family names that no one seems to pronounce correctly. I’ve been there and it can be annoying.

Luckily, you can fix this on your iPhone and iPad with custom pronunciations. If there’s a word or phrase that you want to hear spoken a specific way, you can add it to your device and from then on, hear it pronounced the way you want. Here’s how to add your own pronunciations on iOS.

Add pronunciations on iPhone and iPad

Whether you’re doing this in conjunction with those spoken content features for Accessibility or another reason, you’ll still head to the Accessibility section of your device Settings. From there, it’s a breeze.

1) In Settings > Accessibility, select Spoken Content under Vision.

2) Scroll to the bottom and tap Pronunciations.

3) Tap the plus sign on the top right to add one.

4) Enter the word or phrase in the Phrase box.

5) Below that, tap the microphone icon in the Substitution box. Alternatively, you can type how you want it pronounced.

6) Speak the word or phrase as you want to hear it on your device. Remember to speak slowly and clearly.

7) When you see the pronunciations, tap to hear each one and select the one you want.

8) Tap Done.

Back on the Replacement screen, you can tap Play at the top to hear the word or phrase again. If you don’t hear one that fits, tap that microphone icon and say it again until it’s correct.

You can then give your pronunciation a test. If you use Typing Feedback, for instance, pop the word or phrase into Notes, Mail, or another app and listen to it spoken to you. If it still doesn’t sound as you wish, you can go back to the spot above, select it in the list, and pronounce it yourself again.

Optional pronunciation settings

Once you enter your word or phrase and pick the pronunciation you want to use, you’ll see a few additional settings on the Replacement screen.

  • Languages: Select the languages you want to use to pronounce your word or phrase.
  • Voices: Choose to hear a specific voice when your word or phrase is spoken.
  • Ignore case: Enable the toggle to pronounce the word your chosen way regardless of letter case.
  • Apply to all apps: Enable the toggle to use the pronunciation in all of your apps.

Wrapping it up

This may seem like such a small thing. But if you take the time to customize your device in other ways, like its appearance, then why not have it speak the way you want too?

Are you going to give the custom pronunciations a try on your iPhone or iPad? If you do, pop back over and leave a comment for how it works for you or ping us on Twitter if you prefer!

Categories
Popular posts

How to add your own pronunciations on iPhone and iPad

When it comes to using the accessibility features on iPhone and iPad, there are times when you need to make some tweaks. For spoken content it could be the speaking rate or the voice you hear. With this, have there ever been times when things didn’t sound quite right?

A great example is if you have one of those family names that no one seems to pronounce correctly. I’ve been there and it can be annoying.

Luckily, you can fix this on your iPhone and iPad with custom pronunciations. If there’s a word or phrase that you want to hear spoken a specific way, you can add it to your device and from then on, hear it pronounced the way you want. Here’s how to add your own pronunciations on iOS.

Add pronunciations on iPhone and iPad

Whether you’re doing this in conjunction with those spoken content features for Accessibility or another reason, you’ll still head to the Accessibility section of your device Settings. From there, it’s a breeze.

1) In Settings > Accessibility, select Spoken Content under Vision.

2) Scroll to the bottom and tap Pronunciations.

3) Tap the plus sign on the top right to add one.

4) Enter the word or phrase in the Phrase box.

5) Below that, tap the microphone icon in the Substitution box. Alternatively, you can type how you want it pronounced.

6) Speak the word or phrase as you want to hear it on your device. Remember to speak slowly and clearly.

7) When you see the pronunciations, tap to hear each one and select the one you want.

8) Tap Done.

Back on the Replacement screen, you can tap Play at the top to hear the word or phrase again. If you don’t hear one that fits, tap that microphone icon and say it again until it’s correct.

You can then give your pronunciation a test. If you use Typing Feedback, for instance, pop the word or phrase into Notes, Mail, or another app and listen to it spoken to you. If it still doesn’t sound as you wish, you can go back to the spot above, select it in the list, and pronounce it yourself again.

Optional pronunciation settings

Once you enter your word or phrase and pick the pronunciation you want to use, you’ll see a few additional settings on the Replacement screen.

  • Languages: Select the languages you want to use to pronounce your word or phrase.
  • Voices: Choose to hear a specific voice when your word or phrase is spoken.
  • Ignore case: Enable the toggle to pronounce the word your chosen way regardless of letter case.
  • Apply to all apps: Enable the toggle to use the pronunciation in all of your apps.

Wrapping it up

This may seem like such a small thing. But if you take the time to customize your device in other ways, like its appearance, then why not have it speak the way you want too?

Are you going to give the custom pronunciations a try on your iPhone or iPad? If you do, pop back over and leave a comment for how it works for you or ping us on Twitter if you prefer!

Categories
Popular posts

macOS Big Sur: How to customize and use the Notification Center

If you’ve installed macOS Big Sur, you’re going to notice a lot of changes to the appearance of your Mac. And one such change is not only to the appearance but function as well; it’s the Notification Center. The Notification Center on Mac now looks more like the one your iPhone and iPad.

You have a single column for Notifications and Today view, can see notifications grouped by app, and can show less, more, or clear notifications. You can also add widgets and select the size and act on items like replying to an email or snoozing a reminder.

Here, we’ll show you how to customize and use the improved Notification Center on your Mac (running Big Sur or later).

Notification Center on Mac

Here’s what you’ll learn in this article…
hide

1)
Accessing the Notification Center

2)
Viewing notifications


2.1)
Acting on notifications

3)
Viewing Today widgets


3.1)
Adding and editing widgets

3.2)
Finding more widgets

Accessing the Notification Center

Before Big Sur, you would open the Notification Center on Mac using the corresponding icon in your menu bar. Now, you’ll click the time (and date if enabled).

This opens the Notification Center in a single column view. You have your notifications at the top and Today widgets at the bottom.

Viewing notifications

Like on iPhone and iPad, you’ll see your notifications grouped by app by default. This is a convenient way to keep your Notification Center neat and uncluttered. Plus, if you have many notification groups, you’ll only see a few at the top with an option to see X more notifications. Click a group (stack) to view all notifications in it.

If you don’t like the stacked view, you can change it. And the nice thing is, you can change it per app. So, maybe you want your News notifications stacked, but not your emails from Mail.

To changing the Notification Center grouping, follow these steps.

1) Open System Preferences using Apple icon in the menu bar or button in your Dock.

2) Select Notifications.

3) Choose the app on the left that you want to change.

4) At the bottom of the notification settings, click the drop-down next to Notification grouping. This is likely set to Automatic, but you can change it to By App or turn it Off.

  • Automatic: Grouped automatically when more than one notification is received.
  • By App: Grouped by app in a stack with the most recent notification at the top.
  • Off: Grouped by app but not stacked, also, with the most recent at the top of that list.

Tip: You can keep the Notifications Preferences window open while you make the change and then open the Notification Center to have a peek. This gives you a quick way to change it back if you don’t like it.

  • To expand a group, click the notification on top of the stack.
  • To collapse a group, click Show Less.
  • To close a single notification, click the X on the top left of it.
  • To clear a group of notifications, put your cursor over the X and click Clear All.

Acting on notifications

Some notifications like Mail, Reminders, and Calendar let you take actions in the Notification Center. Select a notification and then click the Options drop-down box and pick what you’d like to do.

In some cases, you can take care of what you need to right inside the Notification Center. For instance, if you reply to a Slack message, you can do it without the app opening.

Other apps will open when you take an action. For example, if you click to Reply to a message in Mail, the Mail app will open ready for your reply.

Related: How to view, pause and stop notifications on Mac

Viewing Today widgets

Below your notifications in the Notification Center are your Today widgets. So if you used widgets in this area before Big Sur, rest assured, you still can. And, you simply click on a widget to open the app like before.

You can quickly rearrange your widgets by selecting dragging them where you want them. Just note that widgets stay at the bottom of the Notification Center.

Adding and editing widgets

You can add more widgets or edit existing ones. Scroll to the very bottom of the Notification Center and click Edit Widgets. You then have a full screen view to work with.

On the left are the available widgets with a Search box at the top if you want a particular one. In the center are previews of the widgets with available sizes and on the right is how the widgets display in the Notification Center.

Similar to how sizeable widgets work on iOS 14 and iPadOS 14, just click a size to view a preview. Note: Not all widgets come in a variety of sizes. Then, add the widget one of two ways.

  • Click the plus sign in green on the top left of the widget to add it to the bottom of your other widgets.
  • Drag it to the spot you want it in the Today widget area.

Click Done on the bottom right of the screen when you finish.

Finding more widgets

There currently isn’t a way to find more Notification Center widgets on the App Store from the widget editing screen. Those you see on the left or find with the Search are only for apps you have installed on your Mac. Hopefully Apple will add a link for widgets on the App Store down the road. But if you open the App Store on your Mac and search for “Notification Center widgets” you can find some others.

Any time you install a new app that offers a Notification Center widget, it should display as an option on the widget editing screen.

Wrapping it up

The updated Notification Center on Big Sur make take some getting used to if you’re new to this layout, for instance, if you don’t already own an iOS device. But it gives a condensed, nice one-column view of both notifications and Today widgets at a glance.

Let us know your thoughts on the Notification Center on macOS Big Sur! Are you happy to see it look more like iOS or did you prefer it the way it was?

Not sure about downloading Big Sur? Check out the macOS Big Sur system requirements before you do! Also, take a look at some of the other interesting features you’ll get with Big Sur.

Categories
Popular posts

macOS Big Sur: How to customize and use the Notification Center

If you’ve installed macOS Big Sur, you’re going to notice a lot of changes to the appearance of your Mac. And one such change is not only to the appearance but function as well; it’s the Notification Center. The Notification Center on Mac now looks more like the one your iPhone and iPad.

You have a single column for Notifications and Today view, can see notifications grouped by app, and can show less, more, or clear notifications. You can also add widgets and select the size and act on items like replying to an email or snoozing a reminder.

Here, we’ll show you how to customize and use the improved Notification Center on your Mac (running Big Sur or later).

Notification Center on Mac

Here’s what you’ll learn in this article…
hide

1)
Accessing the Notification Center

2)
Viewing notifications


2.1)
Acting on notifications

3)
Viewing Today widgets


3.1)
Adding and editing widgets

3.2)
Finding more widgets

Accessing the Notification Center

Before Big Sur, you would open the Notification Center on Mac using the corresponding icon in your menu bar. Now, you’ll click the time (and date if enabled).

This opens the Notification Center in a single column view. You have your notifications at the top and Today widgets at the bottom.

Viewing notifications

Like on iPhone and iPad, you’ll see your notifications grouped by app by default. This is a convenient way to keep your Notification Center neat and uncluttered. Plus, if you have many notification groups, you’ll only see a few at the top with an option to see X more notifications. Click a group (stack) to view all notifications in it.

If you don’t like the stacked view, you can change it. And the nice thing is, you can change it per app. So, maybe you want your News notifications stacked, but not your emails from Mail.

To changing the Notification Center grouping, follow these steps.

1) Open System Preferences using Apple icon in the menu bar or button in your Dock.

2) Select Notifications.

3) Choose the app on the left that you want to change.

4) At the bottom of the notification settings, click the drop-down next to Notification grouping. This is likely set to Automatic, but you can change it to By App or turn it Off.

  • Automatic: Grouped automatically when more than one notification is received.
  • By App: Grouped by app in a stack with the most recent notification at the top.
  • Off: Grouped by app but not stacked, also, with the most recent at the top of that list.

Tip: You can keep the Notifications Preferences window open while you make the change and then open the Notification Center to have a peek. This gives you a quick way to change it back if you don’t like it.

  • To expand a group, click the notification on top of the stack.
  • To collapse a group, click Show Less.
  • To close a single notification, click the X on the top left of it.
  • To clear a group of notifications, put your cursor over the X and click Clear All.

Acting on notifications

Some notifications like Mail, Reminders, and Calendar let you take actions in the Notification Center. Select a notification and then click the Options drop-down box and pick what you’d like to do.

In some cases, you can take care of what you need to right inside the Notification Center. For instance, if you reply to a Slack message, you can do it without the app opening.

Other apps will open when you take an action. For example, if you click to Reply to a message in Mail, the Mail app will open ready for your reply.

Related: How to view, pause and stop notifications on Mac

Viewing Today widgets

Below your notifications in the Notification Center are your Today widgets. So if you used widgets in this area before Big Sur, rest assured, you still can. And, you simply click on a widget to open the app like before.

You can quickly rearrange your widgets by selecting dragging them where you want them. Just note that widgets stay at the bottom of the Notification Center.

Adding and editing widgets

You can add more widgets or edit existing ones. Scroll to the very bottom of the Notification Center and click Edit Widgets. You then have a full screen view to work with.

On the left are the available widgets with a Search box at the top if you want a particular one. In the center are previews of the widgets with available sizes and on the right is how the widgets display in the Notification Center.

Similar to how sizeable widgets work on iOS 14 and iPadOS 14, just click a size to view a preview. Note: Not all widgets come in a variety of sizes. Then, add the widget one of two ways.

  • Click the plus sign in green on the top left of the widget to add it to the bottom of your other widgets.
  • Drag it to the spot you want it in the Today widget area.

Click Done on the bottom right of the screen when you finish.

Finding more widgets

There currently isn’t a way to find more Notification Center widgets on the App Store from the widget editing screen. Those you see on the left or find with the Search are only for apps you have installed on your Mac. Hopefully Apple will add a link for widgets on the App Store down the road. But if you open the App Store on your Mac and search for “Notification Center widgets” you can find some others.

Any time you install a new app that offers a Notification Center widget, it should display as an option on the widget editing screen.

Wrapping it up

The updated Notification Center on Big Sur make take some getting used to if you’re new to this layout, for instance, if you don’t already own an iOS device. But it gives a condensed, nice one-column view of both notifications and Today widgets at a glance.

Let us know your thoughts on the Notification Center on macOS Big Sur! Are you happy to see it look more like iOS or did you prefer it the way it was?

Not sure about downloading Big Sur? Check out the macOS Big Sur system requirements before you do! Also, take a look at some of the other interesting features you’ll get with Big Sur.

Categories
Popular posts

Odyssey jailbreak picks up support for iOS 13.5.1-13.7 thanks to new exploit

The Odyssey Team updated its iOS 13-centric Odyssey jailbreak tool at the crack of dawn Friday morning to version 1.2, adding support for the new iOS 13.5.1-13.7 exploit that was released by FreeTheSandbox in collaboration with ZecOps just yesterday.

An announcement about the release was Tweeted by the Odyssey Team’s official Twitter account this morning with a link for avid jailbreakers to download the tool for themselves:

Additional context was provided in the Sileo / Odyssey / Chimera Discord channel, in which Odyssey Team lead developer CoolStar shared the full change log for this release and mentioned some other important tidbits that might be worth noting before trying the jailbreak for yourself:

Odyssey 1.2 has dropped for all iOS devices on 13.0 – 13.7!!!!

Changes:

– Supports iOS 13.0 – 13.7 on all iOS devices
– Significantly better success rate on iOS 13.3.1 and higher
– Significantly faster exploit for all iOS 13.0 – 13.7
– Uses FreeTheSandbox’s exploit by default on all 13.0 – 13.7
– Removes time_waste exploit
– tardy0n is still available as an option if needed (though it’s hidden as FreeTheSandbox’s exploit is way better)
– Fixes issues with tweaks not injecting sometimes into certain processes
– Improves stability post-jailbreak

For best results, reboot your device and wait 15 seconds before running the jailbreak. If it fails to run, make sure to wait 15 seconds after reboot before running it. Success rate seems to be about 90% in my testing.

In a follow-up message, CoolStar said that Odyssey v1.2 may have trouble jailbreaking devices equipped with A8-A9 chips, but that those equipped with A10 and newer chips should be fine:

FYI it has come to my attention Odyssey 1.2 may not work on A8 or A9 devices. A10 and higher should be good to go though. A9 issues will be looked at shortly (expect 1.2.1 soon).

A8/A9 can use Odysseyra1n for now (or revert to the prior version if you’re on 13.5 or older).

For what it’s worth, the Odyssey Team’s Odysseyra1n bootstrap allows the checkra1n jailbreak tool to do the heavy-lifting on A8-A9 devices while still providing an Odyssey-esque user experience, so this isn’t that big of a problem for now. On the other hand, the Odyssey Team is expected to release version 1.2.1 of its jailbreak tool very soon to resolve the aforementioned issue, at least for A9-equipped handsets.

If you followed the jailbreaking best practices and you stayed on iOS 13.5.1-13.7 without upgrading to iOS 14 earlier this Fall, then you’re now in a good position to jailbreak your handset. You have the option of using Odyssey right now, or you could continue waiting for Pwn20wnd to update the unc0ver jailbreak. This will depend on which bootstrap and package manager you prefer.

Even if you’re running iOS 13.5 or older, if you’ve been using the Odyssey jailbreak, then you may want to download the latest version and deploy it on your device. It includes plenty of bug fixes and improvements that may help your jailbreak feel more performant and stable.

The latest version of the Odyssey jailbreak can be had from the Odyssey Team’s theodyssey.dev website. Once downloaded, you may follow the steps in our detailed step-by-step tutorial showing you how to get jailbroken with Odyssey using AltStore.

Will you download the latest version of Odyssey and jailbreak iOS 13.5.1-13.7? Let us know in the comments section down below.

Categories
Popular posts

Odyssey jailbreak picks up support for iOS 13.5.1-13.7 thanks to new exploit

The Odyssey Team updated its iOS 13-centric Odyssey jailbreak tool at the crack of dawn Friday morning to version 1.2, adding support for the new iOS 13.5.1-13.7 exploit that was released by FreeTheSandbox in collaboration with ZecOps just yesterday.

An announcement about the release was Tweeted by the Odyssey Team’s official Twitter account this morning with a link for avid jailbreakers to download the tool for themselves:

Additional context was provided in the Sileo / Odyssey / Chimera Discord channel, in which Odyssey Team lead developer CoolStar shared the full change log for this release and mentioned some other important tidbits that might be worth noting before trying the jailbreak for yourself:

Odyssey 1.2 has dropped for all iOS devices on 13.0 – 13.7!!!!

Changes:

– Supports iOS 13.0 – 13.7 on all iOS devices
– Significantly better success rate on iOS 13.3.1 and higher
– Significantly faster exploit for all iOS 13.0 – 13.7
– Uses FreeTheSandbox’s exploit by default on all 13.0 – 13.7
– Removes time_waste exploit
– tardy0n is still available as an option if needed (though it’s hidden as FreeTheSandbox’s exploit is way better)
– Fixes issues with tweaks not injecting sometimes into certain processes
– Improves stability post-jailbreak

For best results, reboot your device and wait 15 seconds before running the jailbreak. If it fails to run, make sure to wait 15 seconds after reboot before running it. Success rate seems to be about 90% in my testing.

In a follow-up message, CoolStar said that Odyssey v1.2 may have trouble jailbreaking devices equipped with A8-A9 chips, but that those equipped with A10 and newer chips should be fine:

FYI it has come to my attention Odyssey 1.2 may not work on A8 or A9 devices. A10 and higher should be good to go though. A9 issues will be looked at shortly (expect 1.2.1 soon).

A8/A9 can use Odysseyra1n for now (or revert to the prior version if you’re on 13.5 or older).

For what it’s worth, the Odyssey Team’s Odysseyra1n bootstrap allows the checkra1n jailbreak tool to do the heavy-lifting on A8-A9 devices while still providing an Odyssey-esque user experience, so this isn’t that big of a problem for now. On the other hand, the Odyssey Team is expected to release version 1.2.1 of its jailbreak tool very soon to resolve the aforementioned issue, at least for A9-equipped handsets.

If you followed the jailbreaking best practices and you stayed on iOS 13.5.1-13.7 without upgrading to iOS 14 earlier this Fall, then you’re now in a good position to jailbreak your handset. You have the option of using Odyssey right now, or you could continue waiting for Pwn20wnd to update the unc0ver jailbreak. This will depend on which bootstrap and package manager you prefer.

Even if you’re running iOS 13.5 or older, if you’ve been using the Odyssey jailbreak, then you may want to download the latest version and deploy it on your device. It includes plenty of bug fixes and improvements that may help your jailbreak feel more performant and stable.

The latest version of the Odyssey jailbreak can be had from the Odyssey Team’s theodyssey.dev website. Once downloaded, you may follow the steps in our detailed step-by-step tutorial showing you how to get jailbroken with Odyssey using AltStore.

Will you download the latest version of Odyssey and jailbreak iOS 13.5.1-13.7? Let us know in the comments section down below.

Categories
Popular posts

Jailbreakers who have trouble seeing tiny website text may find SafariReader useful

Those suffering from impaired vision may find it more challenging to read web pages in the Safari web browser on the iPhone and iPad. While pinch to zoom offers a viable short-term solution, it doesn’t necessarily make reading websites with tiny text any less cumbersome because users would still need to pan and scroll around on the website to keep zoomed text in sight while reading.

SafariReader is a newly released and free jailbreak tweak by iOS developer ljinc that sets out to offer a more ideal solution to the aforementioned qualm. It does so by empowering the user to adjust the website’s text zoom level with nothing more than a double-tap.

As depicted in the before and after screenshot examples above, the tweak can make a website’s text a lot more legible, especially if some users find that the text is too small to see at first glance. Additionally, users may use the double-tap gesture over and over again until satisfied with the zoom level, as there doesn’t appear to be a zoom limit of any kind.

One thing worth noting is that there doesn’t seem to be a way to revert back to the original zoom level without re-loading the web page. We find this to be somewhat frustrating, as it would be ideal to have the option to zoom back out with another gesture of some kind. On the other hand, the ends justify the means, as the tweak easily defeats the small text size issue for websites that some might find difficult to read.

While true that iOS offers text size options in the Accessibility section of the Settings app, these settings apply to every app and may not be ideal for 24/7 use. With SafariReader, users can invoke larger text on demand directly in the Safari app and revert back to default much more readily without the need to navigate the Settings app.

SafariReader doesn’t come with any options to configure, and anyone interested in giving the tweak a try may download it for free from the BigBoss repository via their favorite package manager. SafariReader supports jailbroken iOS 9, 10, 11, 12,13, and 14 devices and is only intended for the Safari web browser.

Do you plan to use SafariReader to augment your website consumption experience? Let us know in the comments section down below.

Categories
Popular posts

ProjectX lets jailbreakers colorize various apps’ user interfaces

Perhaps you’ve got a jailbroken iPhone or iPad and you’re looking to personalize your handset’s user interface more than you can out of the box. Or perhaps you’re happy with the user interface, but simply wish that you could use different colors than the ones Apple provides to you.

If either of the aforementioned circumstances sounds like it applies to you, then we think you’re going to enjoy a newly released jailbreak tweak dubbed ProjectX by iOS developer Ethan Whited, as it can make colorizing the iOS or iPadOS user interface, regardless of the app, possible with just a few taps.

As shown in the screenshot examples above, ProjectX colorizes various aspects of an application’s user interface, including primary and secondary background colors, a tint color for buttons and selections, and primary and secondary label colors, among other things.

Once installed, users will find a dedicated preference pane in the Settings app where they can configure the tweak to their liking:

Here, you can:

  • Toggle ProjectX on or off on demand
  • Choose the apps that ProjectX will impact
  • Enable or disable a secondary background color
  • Choose your preferred color schemes for dark mode
  • Choose your preferred color schemes for light mode
  • Apply your settings to save them

When selecting your color schemes for dark and light mode independently of one another, users will have the following colorization choices:

  • Primary background color
  • Secondary background color
  • Tint color
  • Primary label color
  • Secondary label color

As you might come to expect from an AppList-driven tweak, the app selection interface is relatively straightforward. Simply tap on the “Select Apps” button and then toggle all the apps that you want to append these changes to.

Not everyone is in the market for aesthetic-driven modifications like those offered by ProjectX, and that’s both understandable and alright. The idea is that the option is there for any jailbreaker who might want to add some personalization to their device, and those who don’t can just keep on walking.

Those interested in giving ProjectX a try can purchase it for $1.00 from the Twickd repository via their favorite package manager. The tweak supports jailbroken iOS 13 devices, but unfortunately doesn’t yet support iOS 14 at the time of this writing.

Do you plan to colorize any part of your pwned iPhone or iPad’s user interface with ProjectX? Let us know in the comments section down below.

Categories
Popular posts

Apple’s original HomePod has been jailbroken with checkra1n

When most people think of a jailbreak tool like checkra1n, among the first things that come to mind are iPhones, iPod touches, iPads, and Apple TVs. Interestingly enough, the checkra1n team has shown time and time again that the checkm8 bootrom exploit that powers this particular jailbreak is commanding enough to hack even some of the most arbitrary of things, including Apple’s T2 chip, which resides in a variety of Macs.

On Thursday, we learned that even Apple’s HomePod Smart Speaker devices are susceptible to the checkra1n jailbreak. The news, first shared this afternoon by Twitter user @_L1ngL1ng_, took many avid jailbreakers by surprise:

In the Tweet, we can clearly see a screenshot of a macOS Terminal window in which the command line text suggests successful root access to the HomePod in question via a secure shell (SSH) connection. Notably, the command line text also indicates that this is a first-generation HomePod (identified as AudioAccessory1,1,) and not Apple’s new HomePod mini (which would be identified as AudioAccessory5,1).

Additionally, @_L1ngL1ng_ is seen crediting checkra1n team member @DanyL931 in the Tweet for his help in making this achievement possible.

Impressive indeed, but the novel feat certainly raises a lot of questions about what would be possible with a jailbroken HomePod device. In an /r/jailbreak thread regarding the news, commenters threw around some ideas that included, but weren’t limited to:

  • Permitting the HomePod to be used as an actual Bluetooth speaker without having to use AirPlay
  • Enabling the presentation of custom display colors
  • Empowering users with the choice to use Google Assistant instead of Siri
  • And more…

For what it’s worth, the aforementioned bullet points are just ideas and aren’t representative of what might actually be possible with a jailbroken HomePod. For all we know at this time, most (if not all) of the above may not even be possible, but it can be nice to dream…

It remains to be seen whether the checkra1n team will integrate this functionality into its jailbreak in another upcoming update, but given that they’ve already added support for the Mac’s T2 chip despite how few users actually take advantage of this feature, it doesn’t seem too far out of the question.

Would you rush to jailbreak your HomePod, or are you like me and haven’t even bothered to pick one up? Let us know in the comments section below.

Categories
Popular posts

ZecOps releases tfp0 exploit for iOS 13.5.1-13.7


As promised, following security researcher 08Tcw3BB’s much anticipated presentation at HITB CyberWeek 2020, affiliated software security firm ZecOps has officially released an exploit for iOS & iPadOS 13.5.1-13.7.

The announcement, shared this Thursday afternoon via the ZecOps Twitter account, links to a blog post on the firm’s own website that discusses the exploit, how it works via a proof of concept, and how an attacker could use it:

In the blog post, we find a Local Privilege Escalation (LPE) proof of concept that can be compiled with Xcode and side-loaded onto your iPhone or iPad. This, of course, requires a Mac.

This is particularly good news for the jailbreak community, as the exploit is capable of achieving tfp0 – otherwise known as a kernel task port – which enables arbitrary reads and writes to the handset’s kernel memory. As you might come to expect, this is just the sort of thing that a jailbreak developer would need to make a jailbreak function on a specific version of iOS or iPadOS.

As we know from previous comments made by 08Tc3wBB, the exploit will be shared with unc0ver lead developer Pwn20wnd such that the jailbreak tool can be updated to support the targeted versions of iOS and iPadOS. But now that the exploit has been released to the general public, it’s worth noting that other jailbreak teams have also taken note.

One such team is the Odyssey Team, with Odyssey jailbreak lead developer CoolStar announcing via the official Discord channel this afternoon that the jailbreak would be updated to support up to iOS & iPadOS “shortly:”

As it would seem, both the major public jailbreak tools may soon add official support for iOS & iPadOS 13.5.1-13.7, which means it doesn’t really matter which tool you prefer. As an additional option, FreeTheSandbox is currently working to release its own jailbreak tool with support for iOS & iPadOS 13.5.1-13.7, and hopes to maintain it as exploits for later versions of iOS and iPadOS materialize going forward.

Are you excited that iOS &iPadOS 13.5.1-13.7 will soon be publicly jailbreakable on all available devices outside of the scope of checkra1n, or have you already updated to iOS or iPadOS 14? Let us know by dropping a comment down below.